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America’s New (Third-) World Order

This week on democracy-ish, Danielle and Toure discuss the state of the 2020 race and the racial divides that shape our not-so-great country.

  • Breonna Taylor’s family received a $12 million settlement for her wrongful death, but real justice remains elusive: The cops who killed her haven’t been arrested or charged.

  • HHS official Michael Caputo’s viral Facebook rant suggested that if Trump doesn't win, we’ll face armed militias, while the CDC employs scientists who tell us lies … to undermine the president. (?)

  • Speaking of lies, how should we punish those who are complicit in the Trump administration’s malfeasance?

Six months after her murder by police, Breonna Taylor’s family received a settlement in their wrongful death lawsuit. But real justice remains elusive.


“Her family is $12 million richer,” says Toure. “And yet we are all still poorer.”


Although it was among the largest payouts by cities for high-profile police shootings and was accompanied by a number of promised reforms, “no one has been arrested or charged,” he adds.


Danielle thinks $12 million is “just –– it’s right. It doesn't equate to justice, though. Cities paint ‘Black lives matter’ on the street. [White] actors say they won't voice Black characters anymore. The fashion industry is taking on its own racism.”


But it seems like America is “doing everything but the one thing that Black people are asking for, which is fucking justice,” she argues. “Which is: Arrest the cops who killed Breonna Taylor.”


With fewer than 50 sleeps until Election Day, it looks like Russia and China could really decide who wins. As we pass the grim milestone of 200,000 COVID-19 deaths, Trump held a mask-free rally in Nevada.


It’s official: We are a shithole country. Let’s wade into the muck.


Episode Highlights –– We’re a Shithole Country


Fear and loathing in the P.D.

For Toure, a crucial part of the police brutality problem is cops’ “irrational fear” of Black people.


“But they have badges and guns,” he says. “They don't see themselves as aggressors. They are the victims.”


A few cases in point: In Philadelphia, a cop used a baton to crack open an unarmed, peaceful protester’s skull. The officer was removed from the force. But we saw him walking out of the precinct to cheers and applause from his fellow officers ––  “as if he had not done something horrible and shameful,” says Toure.


And Toure is still pissed about the “Officer Karen” who went live on Facebook when McDonald's took longer than usual with her order.


When Danielle sees those kinds of tears, she says, “Go into another line of work. You didn't have to choose this. If you’re afraid of people, you don't have to be a police officer. Nobody drafted you.”


White America in general embraces the role of victim, “violence and threats, whether it’s caravans of undocumented people or the suburbs turning into crime-infested cities,” she adds. “It's made up. Most of the violence in this country has been perpetrated by white men.”


Trump ‘hopes’ and refuses to change

ABC’s “20/20” held a town hall with Trump and a socially-distanced audience this week. Danielle and Toure watched it so you don’t have to.


A notable “highlight”: Pastor Carl Day of Philadelphia (a Jill Stein voter, incidentally) asked Trump: “You’ve coined the phrase make America great again. When has America been great for African-Americans in the ghetto of America? Are you aware of how tone-deaf that comes off to the African-American community?”


Trump’s response was rambling, incoherent, and quick to blame the “horrible situation from China.”


Prior to the pandemic, the president claimed we were living through the “best single moment in the history of the African-American people in this country, I think, you know, I would say.”


Pastor Day pressed Trump to clarify: “We need to see when was that great, because that pushes us back to a time in which we cannot identify with such greatness … You have yet to address and acknowledge there’s been a race problem in America.”


To that, Trump responded: “I hope there’s not a race problem. I can tell you, there’s none with me, because I have great respect for all races, for everybody.”